Laylah Talks Trans Identity

One such youth is Laylah Beattie, a 20 year old blogger, journalist and social activist who prides herself on being an outspoken voice for the trans community. She is a keen writer, and poet, and articulately charts her experiences of life as an Irish trans woman on her ”Laylah Talks” site. She has even written an autobiography entitled ”Who Cares” to 5 star Amazon reviews, and made appearances on the Late Late Show, just recently alongside Caitlyn Jenner. Beattie is clearly not backward in coming forward about her life thus far. As such, she was only too happy to speak with me about points of interest such as her transition, gender norms, transphobia and how life has changed since Laylah came to light.

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A Letter About Me-Danú Connolly Fanning.

Now that I’ve made my ebook “Just Saying” free to the public (you can download the full thing here), I’ve decided to publish the unseen chapters here on my website. Below is a chapter from this book which was published in September 2016.

A few weeks ago I set Danú a task; to write me a chapter for this book. I did this for two reasons. 1) I knew how sick of my voice every reader would be at this point and 2) Her and I have one of the most special relationships that’s currently in my life. I told her that it could be however long and be about whatever she wanted. I wanted it to be honest and reflective of our relationship. The result was slightly more honest than I actually expected but I appreciate that. I’ll shut up now and let her speak.

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Get to Know Transgender Activist David Beattie

As an author, blogger and model, DAVID BEATTIE, 19, is also a LEADING VOICE in TRANSGENDER RIGHTS in Ireland and beyond…

On finding my voice: I’ve always had a very strong sense of what’s right and wrong and I’ve always fought for what I believed in, particularly when it came to my right to identify and exist however I wanted to. When I began transitioning, I found I had a lot to say about my experiences of the world. I thought the media represented being trans as a very negative thing, as though you automatically had an awful life just because you were born in the wrong body. I wanted to talk about my own experience which was very different from that so I wrote my first book (Who Cares) and it all grew from there. I’m a firm believer that if you don’t like the world you’re living in, you should do what you can to change it.

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Family.

Now that I’ve made my ebook “Who Cares? Life for an Irish Transgender Teen” free to the public (you can download the full thing here), I’ve decided to publish the chapters here on my website. Below is a chapter from this book which was published in April 2016.

I am blessed. Do I say that enough? Probably not. Especially not to my family. I am blessed to have a really decent family in my life. I was born into a remarkable support network of intelligent, witty and wonderful role models. I owe them everything. I love each and every member of my family dearly and I know for a fact that I don’t tell them that enough.

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Trans-Celtic

As more individuals embrace their true selves, the Celtic nations undergo a transition in identity.

Sexual reassignment surgery (SRS) can be dated back to the early 20th century, with gender transitioning reaching even further into the past. Denmark native Lili Elbe – the inspiration for David Ebershoff’s international bestselling novel, and subsequent film, The Danish Girl – was the first SRS recipient on record, undergoing the procedure in 1930.

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About “Who Cares?”

Now that I’ve made my ebook “Who Cares? Life for an Irish Transgender Teen” free to the public (you can download the full thing here), I’ve decided to publish the chapters here on my website. Below is a chapter from this book which was published in April 2016.

I am overwhelmed in the best possible way at the fact that I’ve finished this book. The process has honestly been so enjoyable. It took me two and a half months to write and I have adored every second of it. I wish that I could now say something glamorous like “I put my life on hold for this book,” but that would be a lie. I wrote it in the nights that I couldn’t sleep. I wrote it on the days that I had no plans. I wrote it after I’d changed in to my pyjamas at the end of a long day in college. I wrote the majority of it during my Christmas holidays, which took up most of January.

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Who Cares? Introduction.

Now that I’ve made my ebook “Who Cares? Life for an Irish Transgender Teen” free to the public (you can download the full thing here), I’ve decided to publish the chapters here on my website. Below is a chapter from this book which was published in April 2016.

I take a deep breath and open up my laptop. “I can’t believe you’re doing this” a voice says. It’s self-doubt. He’s always there. I picture him as a male because I have a bad opinion of men. And he is mean to me. I wish I didn’t have that opinion, but it’s one that I’ve formed over the years. But we’ll get to that later. I’ve learned to ignore this voice only quite recently. I don’t think I’ll ever not hear him but I do not listen and that is the main thing. He is toxic and he does not fit anywhere within my plans.

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Getting Acquainted-Interaction One.

Introspection is a series in which my current nineteen-year-old self has imaginary interactions with my fifteen-year-old self. For more information, click here.

I take a seat on the low stone wall, looking out at the sea. I rarely make it out to Dun Laoghaire these days, even though it’s one of my favourite places.

I spent a lot of time here as a child and always loved doing so. My family only lived down the road, making Dun Laoghaire our local town. I have such fond memories of ice-cream and beach visits and shopping with my relations at a time when days out of the house were so significant to me.

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Introspection-Introduction.

Introspection is the act of looking within oneself.

I believe in introspection and I believe that when embarking on a journey of introspection, it’s vital to delve back into your past. I find it tough to write about my past in a way that honours my younger self. And there’s so much to talk about in my present that I often end up writing about that instead.

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A Night Out From Hell (Part Two).

Read part one here.

Finally, I spotted my friends getting into the club ahead of me and I knew that they’d immediately be running for the bathroom. I wasn’t mad. I didn’t expect them to plait their legs and wait for me to finally join the queue 🙂 where I could pay the entry fee.

A note on entry fees: They’re stupid and I do my very best not to ever pay them. Sometimes I even succeed.

When I paid the entry fee 🙂 and got into the club, the hunt began to find my friends, but first I had to pee. I navigated my way to the bathrooms down in the basement 🙂 of the club and was confronted with a queue that I swear was almost the size of the one I’d just left :). I summoned all my strength to both hold my bladder and to not scream into the massive crowd in front of me and I’m proud to say that I succeeded.

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A Night Out From Hell (Part One).

After my last college exam, I went for drinks with two of my friends. We discussed how much we were going to miss each other over the Summer months (as is standard at end of year drinks) and we tried to make a pact to meet up every two weeks.

As I’m sure you know and I’m sure you’ve been thinking, these kind of pacts very rarely work, but does this mean that you shouldn’t make them? We acknowledged that it would be tough, but we each expressed a desire to meet up and held our glasses up to toast a Summer of actually seeing one another.

That is how, a week later, I ended up going on a night out with my two friends, something that I was happy to do.

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Kiss and Tell

I’m in a nightclub doing my thing. Loud music. Dancing. A packed floor. Jumping in time to the music. Staring straight ahead or laughing with my friends. Taking sips from a long straw or a wine glass. Tossing my hair. Swaying my hips. Occasionally catching people’s eyes and smiling. Enjoying myself immensely.

A stranger will approach. Say something into my ear. I have really bad hearing so I’ll just nod as I try to figure out what they’re after. An arm around my waist. Their breath on my face. I lean in and kiss them.

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I’m a Hypocrite.

Or at least I feel like a hypocrite.

As I’ve previously mentioned, the fact that I present as quite feminine, but identify as male is a source of confusion for a lot of people. And even though I constantly say that I think it’s important that I be allowed to identify how I want to, regardless of how I look, I don’t always put that principle into action in my life.

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Four Months Without Sex Hormones.

In October of 2016, I began getting injected with the implant “Zoladex,” which suppresses the production of sex hormones. People receive it for many conditions but I was prescribed it because I was beginning a male to female gender transition.

The implant is injected using a massive painful needle that’s put into your lower abdomen. Once a month, I’d go to the doctor so she could inject me with this needle. For four months, my testosterone was suppressed and I wasn’t receiving any oestrogen, meaning that I was without any sex hormones. This is standard practice for someone undergoing a gender transition, but it brings a lot of side effects.

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